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Friday, July 24, 2020 | History

4 edition of Atmospheric relative concentrations in building wakes found in the catalog.

Atmospheric relative concentrations in building wakes

J. V. Ramsdell

Atmospheric relative concentrations in building wakes

by J. V. Ramsdell

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  • 9 Currently reading

Published by Division of Reactor Program Management, Office of Nuclear Regulatory Research, U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission, National Technical Information Service [distributor] in Washington, DC, Springfield, VA .
Written in English

    Subjects:
  • Radioactivity -- Measurement -- Data processing,
  • Radioactive pollution of the atmosphere -- Measurement -- Data processing,
  • Hazardous substances -- Measurement -- Data processing,
  • Nuclear power plants -- Control rooms -- Data processing,
  • Atmospheric diffusion -- Measurement -- Data processing

  • Edition Notes

    Statementprepared by J.V. Ramsdell, Jr. [and] C.A. Simonen ; prepared for Division of Reactor Program Management, Office of Nuclear Reactor Regulation, U. S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission.
    ContributionsSimonen, C. A., U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission. Division of Reactor Program Management., Pacific Northwest Laboratory.
    The Physical Object
    FormatMicroform
    Paginationix, 137 p.
    Number of Pages137
    ID Numbers
    Open LibraryOL17593294M
    OCLC/WorldCa41963452

    In the present study, we aimed to determine the changes of indoor radon concentrations depending on various environmental parameters, such as the outdoor temperature, relative humidity, and air pressure, in university building premises of different applications and heights. The environmental parameters and indoor radon concentrations in four different premises were measured each working day.   The book I am looking for, I read probably about 15 - 20 years ago. I thought the Title of the book was "Numbers", but all my searches based on that title have proven fruitless. I believe the book is set in Switzerland, post WWII. The book opens with a man preparing to get on a train. He has a breifcase. He is murdered.

      Since the early Miocene (about 24 Myr ago), atmospheric CO2 concentrations appear to have remained below p.p.m. and were more stable . The concentrations of both these particle size fractions decreased with increasing wind speed as a result of increased atmospheric dilution. Meteorologic parameters such as low temperatures and high relative humidity were shown to favor the formation of new particles.

    Textbooks and Key Book Resources: The main textbook used in this course in is. Atmospheric Sciences: An Introductory Survey (2nd Edition), J. M. Wallace and P. V. Hobbs, Academic Press, This is abbreviated below as. ASI, so that. ASI-7 is page 7 from this book. Professor Houze is a co-author of parts of. The other WSI species’ mass concentrations represent just less than % in PM with the average mass concentrations lower than μg/m 3. It implies that SO 4 2− is the most dominant ion in PM followed by NH 4 + and NO 3, while Na +, K +, Ca 2+, Mg 2, and Cl − are the minor contributors to PM , at the NCTU site.


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Atmospheric relative concentrations in building wakes by J. V. Ramsdell Download PDF EPUB FB2

The ARCON96 code uses hourly meteorological data and recently developed methods for estimating dispersion in the vicinity of buildings to calculate relative concentrations at control room air intakes that would be exceeded no more than five percent of the time. Get this from a library.

Atmospheric relative concentrations in building wakes. [J V Ramsdell; C A Simonen; S B Smyth; U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission.

Division of Radiation Safety and Safeguards.; Pacific Northwest Laboratory.]. Atmospheric Relative Concentrations In Building Wakes Nureg/CR Rev. 1 U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission. by,s.n. edition, in English. The ARCON96 code uses hourly meteorological data and recently developed methods for estimating dispersion in the vicinity of buildings to calculate relative concentrations at control room air intakes that would be exceeded no more than five percent of the Atmospheric relative concentrations in building wakes book 5.

The ARCON96 code uses hourly meteorological data and recently developed methods for estimating dispersion in the vicinity of buildings to calculate relative concentrations at control room air intakes that would be exceeded no more than five percent of the time.

Relative concentrations calculated by ARCON95 are significantly lower than concentrations calculated using the currently accepted procedure when winds are less than two meters per second. For higher wind speeds, ARCON95 calculates about the same concentrations as the current procedure. Atmospheric Relative Concentrations in Building Wakes.

Atmospheric relative concentrations in building wakes. By Jr. J meteorological data and recently developed methods for estimating dispersion in the vicinity of buildings to calculate relative concentrations at control room air intakes that would be exceeded no more five percent of the time.

These concentrations are calculated for averaging. The maximal concentration points for 2 h and annual average were identified in the aforementioned study of ISC-PRIME.

The authors evaluated the results of conservatism of ISC-PRIME for air concentrations in the vicinity of the building using ARCON96 (Atmospheric Relative CONcentrations in building wakes).

Previous models have median ratios between predicted and observed concentrations greater than 2 and account for less than 30% of the observed variation in concentrations. Key word index: Atmospheric dispersion, building wakes, diffusion, models, model evaluation.

1. Introduction. Comparisons of concentrations predicted by traditional building-wake diffusion models with concentrations measured in building-wake diffusion experiments (Ramsdell, Ramsdell, ) show that the traditional building-wake diffusion models do not predict the variations in concentrations that are related to changes in building cross-sectional area and atmospheric.

ARCON96 atmospheric dispersion model endorsed by the NRC for calculation of more realistic χ/Q values in the near-field (documented in Reference 4, Atmospheric Relative Concentrations in Building Wakes, NUREG/CR, Revision 1).

Attachments C and D. This report documents the ARCON95 computer code developed for the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission Office of Nuclear Regulatory Research for use in control room habitability assessments. The document includes a user`s guide to the code, a description of the technical basis for the code, and a programmer`s guide to the code.

The ARCON95 code uses hourly meteorological data and recently. Carbon dioxide (CO 2) is an important trace gas in Earth's is an integral part of the carbon cycle, a biogeochemical cycle in which carbon is exchanged between the Earth's oceans, soil, rocks and the biosphere.

Plants and other photoautotrophs use solar energy to produce carbohydrate from atmospheric carbon dioxide and water by photosynthesis. MEASURES OF ATMOSPHERIC COMPOSITION.

The objective of atmospheric chemistry is to understand the factors that control the concentrations of chemical species in the atmosphere. In this book we will use three principal measures of atmospheric composition: mixing ratio, number density, and partial pressure.

The Atmospheric Relative Concentrations in Building Wakes computer code (ARCON96) was developed for the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) to calculate normalized concentrations in plumes from nuclear power plants at control room air intakes in.

Meteorological Parameters. The concentration of pollutants associated with moving vehicles is determined by several factors: the emission rate of pollutants from the vehicle, mixing induced by vehicle motion, wind speed and direction relative to the axis of the highway, intensity of ambient atmospheric turbulence, reactions to or from other chemical species, and rate of removal to the ground.

This map above shows the relative changes in humidity (atmospheric water content) at the end of compared to the average over the period of satellite observations ( - ) — so this is a type of humidity anomaly map for the year The green areas are more humid than normal and the brown/orange areas are drier than normal.

XOQDOQ was designed for meteorological evaluation of continuous and anticipated intermittent releases from commercial nuclear power reactors. It calculates annual relative effluent concentrations and average relative deposition values at locations specified by the user and at various standard radial distances and segments for downwind sectors.

removed from the atmosphere by photolysis with a lifetime of years. Assuming compliance with the Protocol, and neglecting residual emissions from existing stocks, how long will it take for CFC concentrations to drop to half of present-day values.

Consider a 2-box model for the atmosphere where one box is the troposphere. Atmospheric ozone concentrations, however, vary based on one's location from the Equator.

Ozone consists of three atoms (or units) of oxygen, and is produced from solar radiation interactions. The greatest concentrations of atmospheric ozone typically lie approximately km into the atmosphere. Atmospheric carbon dioxide. The carbon cycle is of interest to understanding climate because it includes two of the most important greenhouse gases: carbon dioxide (CO 2) and methane (CH 4).Most atmospheric carbon is in the form of CO 2, while CH 4 is present only in trace concentrations.

Because CO 2 is chemically inert, it is relatively well mixed within the atmosphere away from forest.Thickness of the Atmosphere Most of the atmospheric mass is confined in the lowest km above the sea level.

The thickness of the atmosphere is only about 2% of Earth’s thickness (Earth’s radius = ~km). Because of the shallowness of the atmosphere, its motions over .Measurements show that atmospheric concentrations of greenhouse gases—carbon dioxide, methane and nitrous oxide —are increasing with time most probably due to human activities.

Atmospheric concentrations of water vapor will increase as the temperature of the atmosphere increases. The buildup Figure Transfer of incoming solar radiation.